Marine oils and lubricants

A little oil goes a long way in protecting your engine

We have enjoyed the most wonderful summer weather this year. It won't be long and some of us will be thinking about winterizing our boat for a few months. 

Our marine technician, Neil Anderson, offers a cost effective tip to protect your engine and fuel lines while your boat isn't being used.

Add a small amount of Mercury QUICKSTOR to your fuel.



When left untreated, some of the fuel components begin to oxidize and form a gum-like substance. This settles in fuel lines and tanks, carburetors and injectors. A 12oz bottle at $22.50 will treat 227 litres. Quickstor will prevent fuel system corrosion, gum and varnish forming and keep carburetors and injectors lubricated - stabilizing  fuel for up to a year.

Two other Mercury products he recommends to invest in:


Mercury QUICKARE should be added at every fuel fill to help control corrosion and moisture problems. Clean up existing varnish and gum deposits from fuel lines, tanks, carburetors, injectors, intake valves and spark plugs. Only $21.50 for a 12 ounce bottle. One ounce treats 10 gallons.

Mercury QUICKLEEN is a deep cleaning treatment to use periodically. Use to prevent engine knocking and piston seize up and extend spark plug life. To treat 227 litres you need only one 12 ounce bottle at $22.72.

However, if you don't intend using your boat and would rather turn it into dollars than having it sitting in storage - then we would like the opportunity to sell it for you. Let us put this sign on your boat.

Your boat would be........ precision groomed and displayed undercover in our showroom.

We will advertise your boat widely and provide prospective buyers with lake demonstrations.
Phone Kevin Cotton  07 378 7031 or email sales@lakelandmarine.co.nz


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                                We stock a wide range of oils and lubricants specially formatted for marine use.

                                   Enquire online here: 

                                             

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